Q&A with Joe Mahoney: a science fiction writer you want to know

A really fun thing about being a reader is discovering new authors. So I’d like to introduce you to a writer you might not know about just yet. Joe Mahoney is a writer and broadcaster living in Whitby, Ontario. His debut novel was published in October 2017. I asked Joe about writing A Time and a Place, his day job at the CBC, and, of course, what kind of refreshments you should enjoy while reading his book.

Before we get to the Q&A, here’s Joe talking about why you should pick up his novel:

Can you describe what your book is about in five sentences or fewer?

A Time and a Place is a time travel, science-fiction fantasy adventure about a man who has to rescue his nephew who’s been recruited into an army to fight a war half-way across the galaxy.

In the course of trying to rescue the boy, Barnabus J. Wildebear must travel through space and time and even into the minds of other beings, including a seagull, an alien cat, and a creature best described as a monster. He also gets a chance to save his sister who died in a motorcycle accident a couple of years earlier.

On another level, it explores philosophical themes such as the nature of free will and the perils of too much knowledge. And there’s a lot of tongue-in-cheek humour.

How did you come up with the idea for the novel?

A bunch of friends and I were writing stories about one another for fun. So I wrote a few pages about one of my friends being controlled by some unknown force. I was trying to evoke H.P. Lovecraft but in a funny way.

A few years later I discovered those few handwritten pages and I liked the ever-so-slightly comical tone. So I changed the names and began turning it into a proper story. It grew organically from there, with the themes and plot suggesting themselves as I went along.

You work full-time at the CBC. How does your day job inform your writing?

My day job at the CBC has influenced the novel in both subtle and concrete ways.  Although I love my job, it was always a great pleasure to dive into the novel after work as a kind of release.

I realized that I was capable of writing a novel after being locked out from the CBC back in 2005 during that summer’s labour dispute, during which I maintained what they called a Lock Out Blog. I wrote so much that summer on the blog that I realized I was capable of writing an entire novel if I only put my mind to it.

Some elements of the novel are inspired directly from the CBC. I describe the artificial intelligence unit, Sebastian, at one point of consisting of “twenty-eight servers and hundreds of desktop units.” That actually describes a networked digital audio editing system called DaletPlus that we have at the CBC. I’m sure there are other unconscious ways the CBC has influenced the novel as well.

How do you like to write (e.g., pen vs. laptop, home vs. coffee shop)?

I started writing A Time and a Place in pen, but after a few pages switched to typewriter, and did about the first five chapters on a typewriter (this gives you some indication how long ago I started on this novel). Then I got a computer and wrote a bunch on a desktop computer. Then my wife and I moved to Whitby, which is a fairly lengthy commute into my job in Toronto, so I bought a laptop so I could write on the train. And that’s where I did (and still do) most of my writing: on the GO train.

But I take that laptop and write wherever and whenever I can. I like to write in coffee shops, in airports, while my kids take swimming or art lessons–absolutely wherever. I don’t care how noisy or busy it is. As long as I have enough elbow room to type, I will write.

What did you learn about yourself while writing this book?

I learned that I have a lot of patience–that I can start a project that literally takes decades to finish and have the perseverance to finish it. I also learned that I’m a perfectionist, which is why it took me so long. Every word in that 103,000-word novel had to be exactly the right word. I’m not sure that’s a healthy attitude, but it resulted in a book that I am happy with.

Who are some of your favourite writers?

I love Stephen R. Donaldson (The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant), Tim Powers (anything by him), Ken Grimwood (Replay), Susanna Clarke (Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell), to name the big ones.  Robert Charles Wilson (anything by him). Thomas Berger (Little Big Man). I have a long list of writers I like, so I’ll stop there!

What’s a book you love that you don’t think gets the attention it deserve?

The Fatness, by Mark A. Rayner. Well, I think it is getting some love, but not as much as it deserves!

In my book reviews, I like to include “recommended refreshments.” What refreshment(s) would you recommend readers enjoy while reading your book?

Ooh, that’s easy. Lagavulin Single Malt Scotch Whiskey. Just a sip from time to time.

What are you working on now?

Two things. I’m just finishing up the audiobook version of A Time and a Place. It’s taking me forever because of the perfectionism I mentioned earlier.

And I’m working on a space opera called Captain’s Away. It’s based on a radio play I produced one time, but this is a completely different take on it.

It’s about a family who become refugees when their space station is blown out from under them. They’re all separated, and have their own wild adventures, and have to find their way back to one another. It’s about the consequences of good and bad leadership. But mostly it’s supposed to be a fun space-opera adventure.

Pick up your copy of A Time in a Place at Bakka/Phoenix Books in Toronto, or you can buy online via Amazon.ca, Joe Mahoney’s website or Goodreads.

 

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That Time I Loved You shares the secrets of a suburban community

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What I read

That Time I Loved You by Carrianne Leung

What it’s about

This collection of linked stories takes place in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough in the 1970s after a spate of suicides in the community. Each story centres on one of the neighbours–adults and children–and provides a glimpse of their various experiences during this time.

Why I picked it up

I came across That Time I Loved You while browsing in my local indie bookstore. I was initially drawn by the title and cover image. Then I pulled it off the shelf and read the first sentence: “1979: This was the year the parents in my neighbourhood began killing themselves.” I didn’t need to read any further to know I was walking out of the store with this book.

What I liked about it

I didn’t realize That Time I Loved You was a book of linked stories until I got it home. (It says so in the book flap, but I guess I skimmed over that part.) Short stories and essays have been speaking to me lately. Maybe that’s because it’s summer, and it’s nice to have a book that’s easy to pick up and put down. The linked stories mean you get a book you can dip in and out of while still allowing you to immerse yourself into one group of characters, the way you can with a novel.

I loved how reading each story resembled wandering through the streets and peering through the windows of the houses, seeing who and what was inside. The reader learns about the secrets that the neighbours keep from each other. I loved the suburban setting being a character in itself–how the landscape affected the characters in different ways. I finished this book earlier this week, so it’s not incredibly strange that I’m still thinking about it. But I believe these characters and their experiences will stay with me for a long time.

These stories touch on many serious issues (racism, homophobia, sexual abuse, mental illness, alcoholism, infidelity). However, it doesn’t feel like a heavy book: There is lightness and joy and humour in these stories, too.

You’ll want to read it if…

This is a great choice if you are interested in character over plot, if you want to learn the secrets and get into the heads of the people you read about. Also, if you’re a fan of novels but want to try the short story genre, this book is a great entry point.

Recommended refreshments

A glass of spiked punch that the neighbourhood kids drink during a party in the book’s final story. (Just remember to go easy. You don’t know how much alcohol is in there.)

Summertime theatre for Toronto bookworms

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Photo by Nextvoyage on Pexels.com

Summer isn’t the best season if you want to attend book events. Bibliophiles will need to wait until fall before book launches and literary festivals ramp up again. Until then, readers in Toronto can attend these book-inspired theatre productions happening this July.

Take in a musical based on Victor Hugo’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame

I’m not a huge fan of musicals. But when the musical is based on a book, I’m more likely to attend. And if you’re a Disney fan, this production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame should interest you even more: All of the songs are taken from the Disney movie. This production has only four performances, so if you want to go, you’d better get on it.

Run: July 6 to July 8

Venue: Isabel Bader Theatre (near Museum station)

Experience a new take on Paradise Lost

This adaption of John Milton’s book-length poem promises to include puppetry and animation. That seems appropriate since it’s part of the Fringe Festival, which champions experimental theatre.

Run: July 6 to July 15

Venue: Theatre Passe Muraille (near Bathurst and Queen Street West)

Take a crash course in Harry Potter

Unlike a lot of readers, I have not finished any of the Harry Potter books. But maybe that is even more of a reason to see Potted Potter: The Unauthorized Harry Experience – A Parody by Dan and Jeff. This show condenses all seven of the books in just over an hour. This is the fourth time the production has come to Toronto, so if you are a fan of the books, there is a good chance you’ve already seen this.

Run: on now to July 22

Venue: CAA Theatre (on Yonge, south of Bloor)

Attend an adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s novel Orlando

What’s even more exciting about Soulpepper adapting Orlando by Virginia Woolf is that the production has its own book club! Read the book and join in online using #SoulpepperBookClub. There are also two dates–July 8 and July 10–when you can attend a live book club discussion after the production. Seems like a pretty good reason to read Orlando, if you haven’t read it already.

Run: July 6 to July 29

Venue: Young Centre for the Performing Arts (in the Distillery District)

Spring and summer reading: the books I want to read next

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It’s the end of May, so it’s basically already summer. For the next few months, I’ll be spending a lot of time with my books outside, sitting in a park or on a patio. Here are some of the books I plan to read.

Books released this spring or summer

Calypso by David Sedaris (May 2018)

I know when I need a laugh, David Sedaris is going pull through for me. So as soon as I heard Calypso was coming out, it went on my to-read list. As if Sedaris’ laugh-out-loud essays weren’t enough to make this suitable summertime reading, the essays in Calypso are apparently themed around Sedaris’ purchase of a beach house. So it’s kind of the perfect book to take to the beach.

Tin Man by Sarah Winman (May 2018)

The latest novel from Sarah Winman was released in the UK in 2017, and I’ve wanted to read it since I first heard rumblings about it. I’ll admit I wasn’t crazy about Winman’s last novel, but I can’t express how much I absolutely loved When God Was a Rabbit (I should really reread that book). Tin Man is about two boys who become friends at 12 years old and then the story jumps forward to many years later to examine what happened in the years in between. It’s described as “heartbreaking,” and I guess I sometimes I like it when books break my heart.

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata (June 2018)

Lately, I’ve been reading a lot of  translations of Japanese books. But I hadn’t heard about Convenience Store Woman until I saw @Booktrovert tweet about it as part of her summertime reading list. The story is about a 36-year-old woman who has worked in a convenience store in Tokyo for the past 18 years. My understanding is that it’s about societal expectations of employment and adulthood, and that it has it’s share of funny moments too.

Life in the Garden by Penelope Lively (June 2018)

I’ve recently developed more of an interest in plants and flowers. Because of this, I was looking up gardening memoirs a few weeks ago and came across Life in the Garden by Penelope Lively. Lively is British, and since the Brits use “garden” to describe what North Americans would call a “yard,” this is not exactly what I was looking for. But this sounds even better! I’m a sucker for books that are described as being part memoir and part meditation on a topic. This book is supposed to be not only a memoir about Lively’s experience with gardens, but it’s also an examination of gardens in literature. Sounds amazing!

Books that are slightly older

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway is our next pick for family book club. It’s been on my bookshelf for a while, but I’ve never read it (assigned reading in university that I never got to). I’m excited to have the push to finally crack this one open.

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami

I’ve been really into Haruki Murakami lately. After years of avoiding him because I thought his books would be too weird for my tastes, I am making up for lost time. I snagged a copy of Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World from a friend who was moving and getting rid of some books. (The bonus is that this was the Murakami title I already wanted to read next!)

Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore by Matthew Sullivan

A co-worker recently read Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore and recommended it to me. It’s about a bookstore patron who commits suicide and the bookstore employee who tries to solve the mystery left behind.

There are more books of course (there are always more books), but these are the ones I want to get to for the next little while. What are you looking forward to reading this summer?

Book clubs for readers who don’t like book clubs

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Book clubs can be a great way to read books you wouldn’t otherwise pick up, or to hear interpretations of books that are different from your own. But the traditional book club isn’t for every reader. Maybe you don’t want to read to a deadline, or maybe you find it hard to listen to someone tear apart a book that you absolutely adored.

If the traditional book club isn’t for you, but you still want to get together with other readers, here are a few ideas for different kinds of book clubs.

Book recommendations club

Get some readers together to share book recommendations (books you’re recently read or ones you read a long time ago and still think about).

#CurrentlyReading club

Gather around to discuss what each group member is reading right now (whether it’s a book you would recommend or not).

Bookish board games club

Meet in someone’s home to play a bookish board game or two. A few examples: The Great Penguin Bookchase, Bookopoly, and Paper Cuts.

Book swap

Instruct attendees to bring a book (or a few) to exchange for a book brought by another attendee. Note: This works best if you bring books you enjoyed and want to share with others, not if you are trying to get rid of books you couldn’t finish or hated.

Bookstore crawl

Get your bookish friends together to visit your favourite indie bookstores. Browse, grab that new release you have your eye on, or pick up a whole stack of new books (maybe bring a tote bag or two).

Literary event group

Check out event listings in your city for book events and organize a group to attend readings, talks, book sales, etc.

Silent reading party

Gather in a member’s home or a coffee shop/pub/park to read alone but together. This is a great option for readers who like the idea of a book club but who just want to read and not talk.

Do you have any other ideas for non-traditional book clubs?